Tyler Paige

Hello, I am an artist, designer, and developer. I work in journalism, video production, and web development —

(“durational media for storytelling.”)

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Price of Climate

The Price of Climate is a series of articles that looks at the financial effects of climate change. It’s a sort of different take than we’re used to seeing. There’s no aerial shots of melting ice caps. The color scheme isn’t ocean blue.

Our design direction comes from ripping off The Weather Channel, which involved this sexy palette of nauseated highlighter colors:

A color palette of hues that are all tinted a bit green

Anyway, the above images are a bunch of components that spanned this multi-part series:

Mask and Reveal

I’ve been working on this component that tries to answer the question, “how do we dissect a photo?”

It’s had a few lives, but this one is my favorite: gave us handwritten annotations of her painting. We wanted to tell the reader what she had to say, and it was important that her hand was present.

Art World’s Newest Star Makes $3 Million Paintings. Is the Crash Next?


Source, Package, Market, and Deliver Your Own Meal Kit

A game about Blue Apron!

My favorite collaborator Jess Kuronen and I got to work with the talented Hanna Sender to talk about how meal kit companies are a logistical nightmare. In this text-based game, readers can make choices that ultimately end up in further complications. Turns out food is really hard to ship!

I got to do some illustration bugs. The theme was like, “Hurry! Capitalism is coming!”

a bunch of little typographic illustrations

Personal Data

Local Car Dealers Rush to Consolidate

The Spotify Playlist

To report on the unusual Spotify IPO, The Wall Street Journal chose to create the world’s worst playlist.

10 Years After the Crisis.

It’s been a decade since the 2008 Financial Crisis, but risk hasn’t disappeared — it has simply migrated elsewhere. I loved this collaboration with the amazing Jessica Kuronen and Gabriel Gianordoli to tell this expansive story in bite-sized factoids.

The Morningstar Mirage

Morningstar has everyone convinced they can predict the future, but their ratings are about reliable as a magic 8 ball. With Jessica Kuronen, we gave them a gold star — or two — for their best efforts. Also we collaborated with Joel Eastwood to make a bunch of data visualization to prove the point.

The Quants

The Quants is a 18-part series re-examining quantitative investing, 10 years after The Journal first investigated them. Along with Jessia Ma and Jessica Kuronen, we made a big package to visually underscore “the quants have officially won.”

Along with the general design direction, I contributed a fun little bigtop animation written in Three.js and some inline glossary components.

Do you want to hear our official award pitch?

In 1974, The Wall Street Journal first wrote about a computer trading system. Today, in 2017, quants are everywhere. Quants now make trades, determine who to hire, price insurance plans, and more. We created a cohesive series package for “The Quants” that referenced its algorithmic roots and how they interpret the world.

Taking inspiration from engineering drawings, we adapted an orthographic perspective to introduce the reader to the mystical world of algorithms, artificial intelligence, and supercomputers. This angle became central to our visual language portraying “computer perspective” that pays tribute to the Journal’s continued coverage of quants throughout the decades.

Our typography and illustrations follow the strict 30-degree axes seen in technical drawings. Photography was directed to highlight parallel lines. The identity of the series is rendered in binary code, dots, and dashes. The WebGL hero animation of the Lede story is a monolithic statement, rendered in orthographic perspective that evokes stock tickers and the information superhighway, perpetually in motion. CSS animations elsewhere in the series further explore these constructs.

All of our interactive and dynamic web elements — from responsive charts to custom pull-quotes — were crafted with static fallbacks to support our native applications.

“The Quants” includes nine stories, three columns, a game, timeline, and other graphics, totaling an 18 piece package. Navigation became crucial to accessing the deep scope of the coverage and functioned as an informational tool for what to expect as it published over the course of a week. The consistent use of “The Quants” logo and our terminal-green color palette unified the series on our homepage, inside our app and across social media.

THE NIGHT ZOMBIE SMARTPHONES TOOK DOWN 911

Jessica Kuronen, Jessia Ma, and I collaborated on a story about reckless teen hackers, a vulnerable national infrastructure, and reckless social media influencers.

I coded some fun elements for this, like a shaking canvas illustration, custom audio players of panicked 911 dispatchers, and scroll-to-populate collages.

I have been practicing my trigonometry to reflect on what a topsy-turvy world this is!

Try resizing your browser while watching

Fan warning!
Your computer’s fans may spin up!
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Fan warning!

Doing some identity design experiments for THUMBLAB.

The Windows of a PoMo Palace

Archived

Open Flame at The Phluid Project

My funny friends at Open Flame (an amazing queer comedy happening) were invited to host a special event at The Phluid Project. I made them this cute lil social media poster to help promote.

Soundtrack was left to their choice. I think they chose disco. It was cute.

America Didn’t Make the World Cup. So Which World Cup Country Is the Most American?

The World Cup is typically a time for newsrooms to wonder, “How can we get Americans interested in this event that we can actually plan for?”

For Gabriel Gianordoli, Jess Kuronen, and I, we figured people would want to know how other countries compare based on several metrics that really define american life:

This project was a fun to code. It’s single page app so it had a router to direct users to different matches. Readers would be directed to the most recent match if thy arrived without a URL parameter. Unfortunately our analytics services equates unique URLs as unique projects, so we ditched that in favor of query parameters.

‘We’ll Turn Your Village Into Soil’: Survivors Recount One of Myanmar’s Biggest Massacres

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