Tyler Paige

Hello, I am an artist, designer, and developer. I work in journalism, video production, and web development —

(“durational media for storytelling.”)

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The Morningstar Mirage

Morningstar has everyone convinced they can predict the future, but their ratings are about reliable as a magic 8 ball. With Jessica Kuronen, we gave them a gold star — or two — for their best efforts. Also we collaborated with Joel Eastwood to make a bunch of data visualization to prove the point.

The Quants

The Quants is a 18-part series re-examining quantitative investing, 10 years after The Journal first investigated them. Along with Jessia Ma and Jessica Kuronen, we made a big package to visually underscore “the quants have officially won.”

Along with the general design direction, I contributed a fun little bigtop animation written in Three.js and some inline glossary components.

Do you want to hear our official award pitch?

In 1974, The Wall Street Journal first wrote about a computer trading system. Today, in 2017, quants are everywhere. Quants now make trades, determine who to hire, price insurance plans, and more. We created a cohesive series package for “The Quants” that referenced its algorithmic roots and how they interpret the world.

Taking inspiration from engineering drawings, we adapted an orthographic perspective to introduce the reader to the mystical world of algorithms, artificial intelligence, and supercomputers. This angle became central to our visual language portraying “computer perspective” that pays tribute to the Journal’s continued coverage of quants throughout the decades.

Our typography and illustrations follow the strict 30-degree axes seen in technical drawings. Photography was directed to highlight parallel lines. The identity of the series is rendered in binary code, dots, and dashes. The WebGL hero animation of the Lede story is a monolithic statement, rendered in orthographic perspective that evokes stock tickers and the information superhighway, perpetually in motion. CSS animations elsewhere in the series further explore these constructs.

All of our interactive and dynamic web elements — from responsive charts to custom pull-quotes — were crafted with static fallbacks to support our native applications.

“The Quants” includes nine stories, three columns, a game, timeline, and other graphics, totaling an 18 piece package. Navigation became crucial to accessing the deep scope of the coverage and functioned as an informational tool for what to expect as it published over the course of a week. The consistent use of “The Quants” logo and our terminal-green color palette unified the series on our homepage, inside our app and across social media.

THE NIGHT ZOMBIE SMARTPHONES TOOK DOWN 911

Jessica Kuronen, Jessia Ma, and I collaborated on a story about reckless teen hackers, a vulnerable national infrastructure, and reckless social media influencers.

I coded some fun elements for this, like a shaking canvas illustration, custom audio players of panicked 911 dispatchers, and scroll-to-populate collages.

I have been practicing my trigonometry to reflect on what a topsy-turvy world this is!

Try resizing your browser while watching

Fan warning!
Your computer’s fans may spin up!
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Fan warning!

Year Ahead / Year in Review

I was the last one to choose my vacation days, so I was working late December.

Doing some identity design experiments for THUMBLAB.

Research and Development

R&D is a website that is performed in front of an audience. The slideshow format is completed by a paranoid reading of a script. It is the story of an intern gone rogue.

Because of the performative nature of this piece, this website is available only to those who have the link. To request access, please email me at tyler clark paige at gmail dot com.

Brief excerpts:

The Windows of a PoMo Palace

tyler.click

tyler.click is a platform for me to release low-pressure, low-anxiety projects. And its backend is up for grabs!

Archived

Map Layers, map players!

WSJ cartographer Renee Rigdon and I were feeling that AI2HTML wasn’t conducive for scrolly-telling, so I built a pared-down version that uses SVGs instead. Now we have a little utility that lets us SVGs (for their layers) without having the text scale with the rest of the composition.

One successful usecase of th technogloy has been showing geo-political changes over time in a fixed area. You can see some demonstrations of this setup in a couple of projects:

Hopefully open sourcing this solution soon!

How $1 Billion Made Its Way to the Prime Minister

Investigators say at least $3.5 billion was misappropriated from 1MDB. Here’s how they believe $1 billion ended up in the bank accounts of Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak.

Follow the money

Back to the Month

Ghost Getters is a corny, over-the-top TV show inside the movie Ghost Team

How do you make a fake TV show effectively spooky?

With too many effects.

Proof that I deserve an IMDB profile